Capture the Flag (Part 2)

I need everyone to take a deep breath because this is going to be a trip. In a previous post I mentioned that flag discourse on Twitter was making me nervous because of the misinformation that came with it. Since then I’ve been keeping an ear to the ground because drama in other communities tends to leak over.

So, there’s been some pan flag discourse again.

Twitter screenshot: pansexual flag was stolen from a South Indian flag

The person who wrote that tweet deleted it a while ago time ago and apologized, but the screenshot has resurfaced on Instagram and things blew up. I searched high and low for anything related to this topic. Exact phrasing, nothing. Not even a tumblr hit and there’s always a tumblr hit on discourse. It was unbelievable. When I did a keyword search I got ONE hit.

Screenshot: fandom.com wiki pansexuality

So I did a less strict search and I just have a couple of questions…

Nothing major, just…where…

Screenshot blog post

…are all…

…the primary sources?!

My next question is how easy is it to make magenta dye before 1949, but we’re going to put a pin in that because I forgot to mention that there’s a exclusionist/separatist group running around on Twitter and I forgot the rest of the internet doesn’t know that.

Twitter screenshot

If you would kindly note the twitter ribbon in asshole #1’s profile pic, that is one of the “eclipse” flags. And I’m just going to let them explain it:

That sums up today’s Twitter drama.

One thought on “Capture the Flag (Part 2)

  1. Ugh. This reminds me of the reverse pan-flag-drama a few years back, when people on tumblr flipped out at GLSEN’s Ally Week for “stealing” the pan flag colors to use in their pages header banner. (Ignoring the fact that Ally Week has used that color scheme for longer than the pan flag existed).

    Like…..it’s just CMYK. It’s basically the most fundamental color scheme since the invention of modern color printing methods. It’s all over the place, in literally every color printer, and in hundreds of company and group logos. Nobody stole it because everyone just copied it from the fundamental physical properties of colored lights and inks.

    Liked by 1 person

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